Official Makes Huge 2020 Election Fraud Announcement

Two Bucks County, Pennsylvania women now face charges after authorities say they filled out mail-in ballots with their deceased mothers’ names just before the November election.

According to The Morning Call, Bucks County detectives reportedly investigated 22 complaints of voter fraud and other election-related dilemmas during the 2020 cycle that saw “record turnout” rates.

“In each of these cases, the system caught the fraud first, as it was designed to do,” District Attorney Matthew Weintraub said in an interview.

Danielle Elaine Dooner and Melissa Ann Fisher faced charges “by summons with one count each of violations of provisions relating to absentee and mail-in ballots, a misdemeanor of the third degree, according to the DA’s Office” a few days later, the report stated.

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The 2020 election cycle was unusual for many of us.

Some who would’ve normally opted for in-person voting chose to mail in their ballots instead. Others masked up and practiced COVID protocols as they stood in line to cast their ballots in person.

Many instances across the nation raised suspicions of voter fraud due to mail-in voting, a process Republicans particularly warned about for so long.

Do stories such as Dooner’s and Fisher’s confirm their suspicions?

In The Morning Call’s report on the incidents, the district attorney is quoted as saying the incidents were isolated and that there was no evidence of “widespread or systematic election fraud here in Bucks County.”

Still, if this occurred in these two instances, how are we to know this couldn’t have happened elsewhere?

The left seems determined to denounce any attempt to unearth fraudulent practices during the 2020 election regardless of whether or not these attempts are rooted in fact.

Though we can debate why they so vehemently denounce fraud accusations, one aspect rings true: this is an issue that deserves to be addressed, especially considering the atypical voting practices presented by COVID-19.

Nearly 42 percent of all ballots cast in Bucks County in 2020 were mail-ins.

In each of the two voter fraud instances mentioned, Dooner and Fisher both completed mail-in ballot applications on behalf of their deceased mothers and signed off on the ballots.

Weintraub said that handwriting analysis confirmed suspicions that something was wrong.

Dooner’s mother, who died on Sept. 21, 2020, was already deceased by the time the mail-in ballot was signed in her name. She signed neither the ballot application nor the ballot itself.

Analysis of Fisher’s mother’s ballot confirmed the same: the ballot had been completed and signed by someone other than the name provided.

Luckily, these ballots were caught in time and neither were opened nor were counted, according to the DA, but he also mentioned several other election-related complaints his office handled.

“Allegations ranged from residency/address issues, voter intimidation, threats to the Bucks County Board of Elections, ballots found in trash, ballot tampering, and family members voting for their deceased loved ones,” according to The Morning Call. “Both county political parties, as well as residents and state and government officials, filed complaints, according to the office.”

These reports were not isolated to Bucks County, Pennsylvania, either.

Reports poured in from across the nation following the November election (and even during the mail-in ballot period before election day), but many people stay silent out of fear of being labeled a “conspiracy theorist” or a QAnon affiliate.

Election integrity is no topic to demean or dismiss. It is an issue that affects every American who values a fair and honest election process.

Anyone who has a complaint deserves to be heard.

Officials have the job of making sure their concerns are addressed.